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moonlightreader

Moonlight Reader

Lawyer, mother, avid reader. Game host extraordinaire! Partner in crime to Obsidian Black Plague! My bookish weaknesses include classics, fantasy, YA, and agreeing to read more books than is even remotely possible.

Powder and Patch by Georgette Heyer

Powder and Patch - Georgette Heyer

Plot Summary, courtesy of Goodreads:

 

For her, he would do anything...

 

Plainspoken country gentleman Philip Jettan won't bother with a powdered wig, high heels, and fashionable lace cuffs, until he discovers that his lovely neighbor is enamored with a sophisticated man-about-town...

 

But what is it that she really wants?

 

Cleome Charteris sends her suitor Philip away to get some town polish, and he comes back with powder, patches, and all the manners of a seasoned rake. Does Cleome now have exactly the kind of man she's always wanted, or was her insistence on Philip's remarkable transformation a terrible mistake?

 

Review below the cut

 

 

Originally published by Mills and Boon in 1923 under the title "The Transformation of Philip Jettan," and then republished by William Heinemann (minus the original last chapter) in 1930. This is one of Heyer's Georgian novels. It is essentially her second novel - published in 1923 after the Black Moth, and then published between The Masqueraders (1928) and Devil's Cub (1932). I could find no explanation for the reason that the book was republished under a new name only seven years after the original publication.

 

I have not read The Black Moth, and feel that I must, as it was written when Heyer was only 18 years old, and was published when she was 19 (she was born August 16, 1902) - this year represents the eleventy-first anniversary after her birth.

 

I did not love Powder and Patch. It has a Pygmalion-ish theme, where the young, rough, country bumpkin (Philip) is transformed into a worldy, fashionable gentleman in order to win the heart of his one true love, the insipid, if pretty, Cleome. In a turn-about-is-fair-play sort of a way, Cleome sends away a decent, honest, straightforward young man who loves her and gets back a well-dressed, popular, flirtatious, dandy . . . who still loves her. She realizes pretty quickly that she got the short end of that stick, and she wants the old Philip back. The one who isn't prettier than she is. The book, honestly, would have been more interesting if Philip had fallen in love with someone who didn't inexplicably want to turn him into this:

 

 

There were a few moments of entertaining farce - the section where Cleome manages to engage herself to two young men - neither of whom are Philip, and neither of whom does she love - is mildly funny. Philip is required to return to his old self and extricate her from her own silliness in managing to muck things up. Thank goodness for a good man to solve Cleome's problems. Otherwise she would've undoubtedly ended up a bigamist.

 

There are many things to like about Heyer's novels. This one, really, possesses almost none of them. It is short, and underdeveloped. Some of her heroines can be quite interesting and empowered. Cleome was about as interesting as a hamster (she seemed to possess about as much sense, as well). The dialogue is usually quite witty and fun. This one really didn't display that characteristic. Plus, I much prefer the Regency period because, frankly, men in tights make me want to retch.

 

So, overall, unless you are a huge fan of Heyer's and intent upon reading all of her work, skip this one.

 

Notes: This review is part of my Heyer Project - a plan to read (or re-read) all of Georgette Heyer's novels.