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moonlightreader

Moonlight Reader

Lawyer, mother, avid reader. Game host extraordinaire! Partner in crime to Obsidian Black Plague! My bookish weaknesses include classics, fantasy, YA, and agreeing to read more books than is even remotely possible.

Currently reading

The Dower House Mystery
Patricia Wentworth
Progress: 42 %
Capital Crimes: London Mysteries: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics)
Martin Edwards
Progress: 105/410 pages
Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection
Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry

The Rose Campbell duology: Eight Cousins

Eight Cousins (Puffin Classics) - Louisa May Alcott

Eight Cousins and Rose in Bloom make up the duology of books about the main character Rose Campbell. These are two of my favorite Alcott books, which I recently re-read for the Alcott event and also for my ongoing series on children's classics.

 

Of the two, I prefer Eight Cousins, which is the story of young Rose, who is orphaned and sent to live at the Aunt Hill, with her two great-aunts. Both Aunt Plenty and Aunt Peace are rather elderly spinsters. Rose has lived with her father, George, apart from the rest of the Campbell clan, which consists of five other Campbell brothers and their wives and offspring.

 

When Eight Cousins begins, Rose is 13 years old. This part of the story takes us through Rose's 16th-ish birthday. Rose is the only girl of her generation, with 7 male cousins from age 16 (Archie) through 6 (Jamie).

 

Rose is sweet-natured, and ends up being raised by her bachelor Uncle Alec, a seafaring doctor who has "ideas" about child-rearing that most relate to girls being treated more like boys, and encouraged to read good books, take lots of exercise, and not wear corsets. Rose is a rather sickly child when she arrives at the Aunt Hill and is rapidly restored to health by dint of a large waistband, fresh milk, fresh air, and lots less sighing over girly stuff. This could be annoying, but it really isn't, since the treatment of girl-children during this era was mostly ridiculous and Rose's raising is much more consistent with how I personally think girls should be raised (with lovely things like access to books and education) versus how they were actually raised.

 

Alcott's father, Bronson, was a well-known educational reformer, and Alcott's stories are full of themes about equality of education for women. Rose is not eligible to attend actual school (being a girl and all), but Uncle Alec makes sure that she has access to resources to allow for some self-education.

 

There is some of Alcott's trademark moralizing, but it isn't as heavy-handed in the first volume of the Rose Campbell story as it becomes in the next. Rose is raised to be, and is generally, thoughtful, modest, honest and generous. She spends a lot of time caring for her sick cousin, Mac, who is the studious one of the lot, and is two years older than Rose.

 

The boys are a boisterous, rowdy crew. The Campbells are obviously quite affluent, and Alcott's theories, as well, about the obligation of the rich to care for the poor are mostly shown through Rose's charitable activities. Rose is quite an heiress, and decides early that she wishes to be a philanthropist and to help others with her fortune. She is a bit of a Mary Sue, but she's so darned charming about it that it works.

 

This is a classic for a reason. It is probably much too quiet and modest a story to appeal to modern girls. Which is too bad, really.

 

The sequel to Eight Cousins is Rose in Bloom. Review forthcoming.